1979 John Deere 410 backhoe.

Bought this backhoe not knowing if it would actually start and run. Machine had not been cranked in over a year. A new fuel bowl, filter, (from a local John Deere dealer open on Saturday with parts in stock!) and fresh fuel were added before attempting to start. The backhoe fired right up after bleeding lines. Tires had ample tread, but were severely dry rotted. The machine would move under its own power, but only in reverse and low range. No high range movement in either direction.

Machine was purchased for less than scrap price with the understanding transmission was bad. There was nothing wrong with the transmission. The problem with movement was adjustment of the clutch valve on left side of reverser. O-rings under priority valve were rotted and leaking. Steering cylinders were pouring oil. Ordered parts from John Deere and replaced priority valve O-rings, steering cylinder seals, and wipers. Adjusted clutch dump valve, replaced aftermarket linkage with original linkage, changed all filters. Forward clutches do have some slippage in high range, however, the 410 will push and dig with no problems in low range.

Have used machine for over 6 years now. The 410 has been very useful and hope to keep it working for a long time...

Stanadyne injector pump was pouring diesel into the crankcase when purchased. Had read in tractor forums about Stanadyne injector pump retainer ring problems. Seems the original style rotted and caused all sorts of annoying problems. Decided I could rebuild a pump too. Rebuilt pump, replaced governor flywheel retainer with a new style that did not have old design flexible ring. The rebuild was less than $200, but only lasted a few months. The pump rotor siezed and snapped the drive shaft. After the disappointing failure of pump rebuild, another injector pump had to be purchased. Buying a rebuilt pump is like rolling dice. A rebuilt pump could be same age as the backhoe or older. Factory new Stanadyne pump was around $1200.00. Over 5 years and 600 hours later the machine fires right up, runs very smooth and no more injector pump problems.

Tires were another issue. The backhoe had not been used much by the previous owner. It had spent a lot of years sitting unused. Even though tread was good on rear tires about a month into using it a problem "popped" up. Was running hoe and a loud bang occurred. Immediately the backhoe listed to the right. Time for new tires. Looked around lamenting the $1400-$1600 cost for 2 new tires. Found 2 brand new tires on Craigslist, still mounted on Kubota wheels. Snow had started early in the morning and was still falling, but made the call anyway to the guy who placed the ad. He said, "$600 for both, and I will load them for you." Drove four hours through the white stuff to get two new tires with wheels for less than what one tire would cost at a dealer.

Found out Kubota wheels have same bolt pattern as John Deere wheels. The offset is slightly different. Replaced the originals and drove around with orange rear wheels for a while. Gave backhoe the CASE look. Blasted, primed and painted original wheels John Deere yellow.

Removed hoe boom cylinder to replace a burst hose. The PC1300 with its rotating boom and winch was again handy to have around. This cylinder is inside the boom housing and would be heavy to lift during removal and installation. Cylinder packing was also leaking. Since packing doesn't heal itself, an opportunity existed to rebuild cylinder.
The original nut on the cylinder rod was very tight. Bent a 3/4" drive pull bar attempting to remove it. The 1 1/2" nut is recessed inside the piston housing and had to be gently heated with a torch to get it moving. No excess heat, only enough to break it loose. Threads had some dings on the end of cylinder rod. Cleaned those threads with a Dremel tool and thread file. A new nut went on smoothly and was tightened to SAE torque specs. Cylinder piston and gland nut assembly shown after installing new seals and packing. Assembled cylinder after rebuilding, new hoses were installed. Time to dig again.